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The Riddle of UX Writing

Lessons from fortune cookies, fairy tales, and neuroscience

Lead Photo: Ben Hersh; all other photos and screenshots, unless otherwise noted: also Ben Hersh

TThe fortune cookie is no ordinary cookie. It eschews the gooey chunks, decorative frosting, and other cheap thrills typical of the confectionary genre. It carries a certain dignity and grace. A gentle arch and intimate fold tell you how to hold it and how to snap it in two. It has a story to tell. It would not be an…

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Helping designers thrive. A Medium publication about UX/UI design.

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Ben Hersh

Ben Hersh

I design tools for everyday life. Currently at Google. Previously at Dropbox, Medium.

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